Delphi 2009 Pricing – Euro Markup = 31%

— start edit —
I made a horrific mistake (worksheet formula cut and paste with wrong cell reference). The correct ratio is 31%, not 47%.
I should have taken a hit from my own comment on the 1.31 ratio… sheesh…

Worksheet updated.

Obviously the 1 USD = 1 EURO assumption was completely false.
— end edit —

Embarcadero / Codegear are still treating 1 USD = 1 EURO. In Norway, the exchange rates give a markup ratio of 1.47 times. Personally, I think that is rather stiff. You can see the calculation here.
http://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=p2-MEmPeO80XesMzxhZXdVA&output=html&widget=true
The middle example with the 1.31 ratio is due to Norwegian EUR/USD currency exchange margins (DnB NOR Bank). The true cost difference for the Embarcadero webshop prices in Norwegian Kroner is shown in the rightmost blue columns.

Tentative prices from one local reseller indicates a markup ratio of 1.33, comparing reseller out price to US webshop price. Why does this feel like being ripped off? When buying software online, I am used to getting the same price as the rest of the world.

Posted on CodeGear forums: https://forums.codegear.com/thread.jspa?threadID=1589

8 thoughts on “Delphi 2009 Pricing – Euro Markup = 31%

  1. Sad reality is that for most software it seems best to just purchase it in the USA. Be it the Windows, Photoshop or Delphi.Apparently Europe is “willing” to pay more for software so they charge more.Personally I ask my brother who lives in the USA to purchase software for me unless I can order it myself.

    Like

  2. This behaviour has stoppped me from buying Dreamweaver for years and personally would stop me from buying Delphi 2009 too. We may still upgrade because my boss pays 😉

    Like

  3. I had the same problem with Dreamweaver. Few months ago I got Access US accounthttp://www.myus.comNow I can order eveything as I would live in US.Dreamweaver in Finland consts 2 times as much as in US. When I called them why they say that localization to Finnish cost. Well there is no Finnish Dreamweaver and they sell English in Finland! Last time I ever do any busines with Adobe Finland.Very sad to notice that CodeGear is bit like Adobe.Hey! If Euro drops like it has done past three weeks we will soon see 1 EUR = 1 USD.

    Like

  4. The problem is not so bad here in NZ, or doesn’t appear to be until you add GST (12.5%) to the price on the CodeGear store pages.For people buying as part of a business they will claim the GST back, but for people purchasing for personal use, that GST is a part of the price.(Aside: if the pricing is to “help” resellers, why does CodeGear have an NZ store that sends business to Digital River – a US company – rather than developers-inc – the NZ reseller?)Back when Delphi was owned by Borland sales policies that favored corporations might have been expected.Corporates are likely to buy boxed product from a local reseller anyway, where-as individuals are surely the prime market for download purchases.For some time now we’ve been being told that CodeGear is “where DEVELOPERS matter”. hmmm…So why not simply remove downloads from the international stores and redirect download purchases to the US store and handle them all from there?At least as a starter for 10, until a more community friendly distributor/reseller channel can be more generally devised.

    Like

  5. I also use http://www.myus.com. It’s the real deal for ebay or Amazon orders of boxed software. I’ve also bought from regular online retailers using my US address. I can get anything available in the US, with great US shipping rates for international.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.